Leaving Work Behind

4 Tips to Take a (More) Successful Vacation

Written by Gina Horkey on June 22, 2015. 7 Comments

I just got back from my first vacation as a full-time freelancer.sandals

I’d give myself a B-. I tried to prepare as much as possible by working ahead on client work, letting my clients know I was going to be gone and setting an out of office message on my email.

But it wasn’t until the end of the week that I truly was able to unplug and relax. Part of this is that I still needed to work in some capacity by checking email for my two virtual assistant clients while away. And part was that I wanted to know what I was missing while I was gone.

Silly, silly me! As I mentioned, towards the end I was able to relax and enjoy myself a bit more. And I learned a lot about myself and my business in the process. Here are my four best tips to help you take a more successful vacation from your freelance business next time around.

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How to Pitch Your Blog Post Idea to the Magazine World

Written by Lis Stedman on June 15, 2015. 6 Comments

Magazine pileSo, you’re writing a great blog post. You’re really pleased with it. And you have a strong feeling that it could
go even further – but how do you make your way into the lucrative yet confusing world of magazine publishing?

Believe me, it’s not as hard as it looks. For a lot of blog writers, getting something into traditional publishing looks daunting and – whisper it quietly – for a magazine writer, blogs look like a mountain to climb too. But there are a few easy, basic rules for success.

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6 Steps to Prepare for a Vacation from Your Freelance Business

Written by Gina Horkey on June 8, 2015. 17 Comments

vacationMan, it’s hard to walk away from work as a webpreneur!

Sometimes as short a period of time as a day can be hard. So what do you do if you want to take an actual vacation? If your business is dependent solely on you, your actions, your presence – how do you make this happen?

Everyone needs to take a break sometime. And odds are that you got into this profession – and became self-employed – so that you had more control. More flexibility to do things like travel and take time off.

If you’re anything like me, you may be working harder (and more) than ever though. Your business is growing due to these efforts, you’re making more money each month, but both of these positive side effects make it virtually impossible to hit pause or take a well needed time out.

Am I describing you? If so, today I want to share a step-by-step process to help you confidently plan and execute your next vacation. I want us both to be able to check out of work every once in a while. Here are six steps to prepare for your next vacation from your freelance business:

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How Much Should Freelance Writers Charge Per Word?

Written by Tom Ewer on May 18, 2015. 35 Comments

Quarter dollarMost beginner freelance writers have no idea what they should charge per word.

I know this because I recently put the word out that I was looking for freelance bloggers to work with me, and I received quotes (per word) from one rupee (that’s about $0.02) to to one dollar.

I’ll start by ruling out the extremes for freelance bloggers: you shouldn’t be working for any less than $0.02 per word, but nor can you reasonably hope to work for anything close to a dollar per word.

But where on earth should you be in-between those numbers?

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Proposing New Article Ideas to Clients: The Ultimate Pitching Blueprint

Written by Gina Horkey on April 30, 2015. 8 Comments

blueprintYou pitched a new writing job and your prospect is interested. Now what?

Unless they’ve given you a clear idea of alternative next steps, it’s typically up to you to propose some blog post or article ideas. You’ll have to do this for prospects, but also for recurring clients that you write for on an ongoing basis.

What does this look like?

Tom,

Thanks for your interest in having me write for Leaving Work Behind!

Here are three post ideas that I think would work perfectly for your audience. Look them over and let me know which one(s) I can move forward with, or if you have any additional feedback.

Proposed Title #1. 2-3 sentences to provide some context to your post idea. Enough to get the client interested, but not a novel that will take too much time to read (or write!).

Proposed Title #2. See above. The explanation would be specific to the second proposed topic/headline.

Proposed Title #3. See above. The explanation would be specific to the third proposed topic/headline.

Looking forward to getting started on my first post due 5/12/15. Thanks!

~ Gina Horkey

How many ideas should you send? What’s the best pitching format? And what’s the best way to handle rejection?

Today I’m going to cover all three of those questions (and more). Let’s dive in!

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